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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > in hope that / in the hope that    

in hope that / in the hope that



Mietz
Germany

in hope that / in the hope that
 
Dear all,

In the key of a worksheet I found both possibilities:

-> I m contacting you in the hope that you can help me.
-> I m contacting you in hope that you can help me. / I have to get in touch with you in hope that you can help me.

I feel that the second version sounds strange, but I found a few examples with "in hope" in British newspapers etc.

What is correct? Are there maybe times, when both are possible and times, where only one of them is correct?

Thanks for your help!
Mietz

8 Nov 2011      



Apodo
Australia

I wouldn t use it in this sentence without the before the noun hope
 
 I m contacting you in the hope that you can help me. - This is correct.
 
These both sound incorrect:
-> I m contacting you in hope that you can help me. / I have to get in touch with you in hope that you can help me.

But you can say  I m contacting you and (I) hope that you can help me (here hope is a verb)
 
I hope you can help me. (verb)
 
These are correct:
There is no hope of finding him now.
There is little hope of finding the lost child. (= we probably won t find the child)
The police kept searching in the hope of finding him.
 
Here is an example where both versions are correct:
There is still hope of finding him alive.
There is still a hope of finding him aive.
 

8 Nov 2011     



Mietz
Germany

Thank you Apodo!

I ve just found this headline by the Guardian:

US markets make early gains in hope of eurozone bailout deal


http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2011/oct/26/markets-gain-eurozone-deal-hopes

OR THIS

I live in hope he will reach out to me before it s too late



Could this be typical for headlines always being cut short?

Thanks!
Mietz


8 Nov 2011     



yanogator
United States

I would say that the headline shortening is the case in the first one, but "I live in hope ..." sounds good.

Bruce

14 Nov 2011