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ESL forum > Techniques and methods in Language Teaching > TPR Storytelling    

TPR Storytelling



zailda
Brazil

TPR Storytelling
 

A colleague called my attention to the method today and I’d like to know if someone has used or has got more information about it. It sounds really interesting.

See more about it at the link below:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TPR_Storytelling

Thanks in advance and have a nice day!

 

10 Nov 2011      





youness
Jordan

I think it refers to ( Total physical Response) which is a very good method of teaching ( using learning by doing )

10 Nov 2011     



David Lisgo
Japan

Susan Gross http://susangrosstprs.com/wordpress/ has been to Japan twice and I hear her seminars are wonderful and people swear by her methods. Myself, I īve only been to one TPRS presentation and I was most uncomfortable as it involved preteaching targets using L1 and lots of drill activities,both of which I hav a distatste for,  but I don īt know if this is the norm, though it was enough to put me off.
 
David

11 Nov 2011     



ueslteacher
Ukraine

David, why do you think of drilling as of something negative? Could you explain please? Maybe I have a misconception of it... but isn īt repetition the mother of all learning?
Sophia

11 Nov 2011     



David Lisgo
Japan

Hi Sophia, 

To me, drilling is fairly rigidly controlled by the teacher and usually involves repeating a target word, sentence or structure after the teacher. Sometimes it proceeds from whole class repetition, to group repetition and then pair work. I īve done it, in fact I feel I wasted too much time on it and it seems to be somewhat of a mindless activity at times. The teacher, often totally bored with it, is trying his utmost to make the activity interesting for the children. I will stop here and say that very young children to seem to enjoy it but as the children get older they lose much interest in it. Anyway, I can īt imagine going back to this kind of drilling and feel that it is probably the cause of many teachers and students losing interest in what they are doing. 

"isn īt repetition the mother of all learning?" Certainly repetition is extremely important but no one is going to learn a foreign or second language solely by repetition (and I īm not suggesting you think this).

 Pronunciation and drilling: I have heard many teachers recommending drilling of individual words to improve pronunciation but I don īt believe that is the best way to go about it because every language has too many words for this method to work well and it usually doesn īt touch the underlying problem, though it is occasionally beneficial. If you know my materials, then you know that I have a great interest in phonics and it is mostly through phonics that I teach pronunciation. If someone has difficulty pronouncing a certain word, and then phonics helps me to focus on whichever sound or sounds a student is struggling with and once a student becomes proficient in pronouncing a difficult sound, then he is able to use his skill with many other words. 

I teach mostly children and of course children love playing games so I īm always designing games and activities which involves a lot of repetition in order to play the game. This is nothing like drilling at all and it is so easy to get the children to repeat something 20, 30, 40, 50 times without them becoming bored (and with minimal teacher involvement), as to them they are only playing a game. 

So, drilling is out, but repetition is in. And I have work to do, so excuse me. 

David 

"David, why do you think of drilling as of something negative? Could you explain please? Maybe I have a misconception of it... but isn īt repetition the mother of all learning?"
Sophia

 

 

 

11 Nov 2011     



ueslteacher
Ukraine

Thank you so much for the useful insights, David! I īve been talking about the use of phonics for years and how much the textbooks lack them. I wish you were my trainer:)
Good luck on your work,
Regards,
Sophia

11 Nov 2011     



miss K.
Ukraine

On British Concil they have an article about this method. I remember reading it when the website still had an old desing. I sort of use it fo children to do simple actions like standing up, sitting down, bringing a chair, getting their books and pens, picking up dice, taking a pencil to color, gluing something. At first children do not understand it but I just show them what to do. It fun to do in games and in making crafts. If you repeat certain phrases during the course of game, children pick that up.

11 Nov 2011     



ElenaGrig
Russian Federation

I used this method for a certain period of time and I quite agree with David. Repeating a word , a structure or even a story after the teacher is behaviourist approach which has nothing to do with the process of language acquasition, but the student īs memory. Of course, the children can produce the structures  and even the whole stories. But can we learn to use the language productively in real life situations if we learn thousands of poems by heart? I īm not sure about it. To be able to speak a foreign language the children need to combine the words and structures they īve learnt in different situations.  The structures that have been learnt in a poem or story are ī īfrozen clusters". The children usually can īt use them correctly in their spontaneous speech. In my opinion, the teachers who want to try this method can use it as a presentation of some words and when they are sure the kids grasped the meaning of the words correctly organise some extra exercises to practice them in well known structures/ situations.

But there is a things about TPR I really like. It is a kind of scaffolding for kinaesthetic students we have in every class.  They learn better when they move and touch. 
 
Elena. 

11 Nov 2011