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ESL forum > Techniques and methods in Language Teaching > Dyslexia and compensatory measures    

Dyslexia and compensatory measures



franciuzzz
Italy

Dyslexia and compensatory measures
 
Dear colleagues, I am a new primary school teacher. I teach English in 7 classes (fourth and fifth grade) and I have four dyslexic students. I am writing here because I īm looking for special worksheets and I īd like to know if you adopt compensatory measures for these children. I īm trying to create something useful for them, but I don īt have much experience and for me it is very difficult. In addition, teaching children aged 9 and 10 years old means deal with topics of grammar, more complex than the vocabulary, and I don īt know how to help my pupils to succeed. Also, they don īt want to be different from the schoolmates (with different tests and worksheets), so it īs very hard to find the right strategy to help them. I thank in advance all of you.
My best wishes, Francesca

13 Jan 2014      





Sevenastious
Spain

I can īt offer any help with special worksheets, but I do remember reading that printing on blue paper can help. 
Also, a friend told me that she had a home tutor who worked with her dyslexic son and her secret was pasting new vocabulary and phrases all over the walls and furniture. I think this ties in with a learning theory that you need to see a word 40 times to internalize it. I heard this in a language acquisition lecture when i was doing my teacher training but it was a very long time ago and i can īt remember much more.

If it gives you hope, this particular boy ended up getting better results in English than in his first language at Bachillerato, but I think this is because the nature of ESL teaching is more suited to dyslexic learners than methods used in first language learning.

I hope this is of some help.

13 Jan 2014     



karagozian
France

I remember That someone here on this site had made a fabulous work about the subject. I īll try to find the link.

14 Jan 2014     



karagozian
France

http://www.eslprintables.com/teaching_resources/other_worksheets/guide_to_understanding_dyslexi_209237/#thetop

Well, I finally got the link.  This may be helpful to you !

14 Jan 2014     



franciuzzz
Italy

Thanks a lot! :)

14 Jan 2014     



jamiejules
France

Hi there!
a link to one of my ws was mentioned! I feel honored! if ever you need any info, practical tips, how to use props or liaising with therapists and/or the rest of the teaching staff... just pm me and I will try to help (have been working with all kind of "dys" kids for over a decade)
have a good evening
Jamiejules

14 Jan 2014     



Peter Hardy
Australia

Have you seen Moody īs latest addition re the word of the day? There he also talks about his sister-in-law having done some work that seems to be of value for kids with dyslexia. His link: Playful Ways to Help Children with Reading and Spelling. (http://arts-humanities.squidoo.com/fun-reading-games). I īve also heard in this forum that different fonts may help, i.e. Comic Sans MS. As all little bits may help, I hope it really does. Cheers, Peter

15 Jan 2014     



cunliffe
United Kingdom

@Peter - oh god, you are for the high jump now - MoodyMoody is a GIRL and proud of it.Wink

Wow, thatīs a great guide. Going to give that out at school. 

15 Jan 2014     



MoodyMoody
United States

It īs okay. Yes, I īm female, but Peter is hardly the first one to mistake my gender on ESLP. That īs what I get for picking a gender-neutral name with a non-gendered avatar.

15 Jan 2014     



littlebee
United Kingdom

A learner with dyslexia will pick up words much more easily if they are presented orally with a visual image, so the meaning is clear. They retain words through learning them visually and semantically. A dyslexic learner will not learn new ideas, or words from the written word efficiently. Give these learners kinaesthetic activities, as they tend to work in 3D. Teach new vocab linked to actions. These learners have problems picking out sounds in words, They can learn a whole word, but may not be able to analyse it into individual sounds, which will impact on spelling. Their īsound ī problem, means they will confuse similar sounding words sometimes, and that they will struggle with listening comprehension, because their memory for sound is poor .. I have read that it can be likened to a fuzzy recording. Given this fact, they cannot always īhold ī a full sentence in memory, and thus cannot derive meaning from it, It is the same if the source is a written word, or one they have hear. I would advise you to get precise info on what the difficulties of each student are. No 2 dyslexic learners are the same. Do they also suffer from visual stress ?? (more details on this at www. humansnotrobots) Using a simple font (comic sans serif) and GREEN paper may help .

23 Feb 2014