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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > will or going to    

will or going to



Ruwayda37
Egypt

will or going to
 
Hello fello teachers. I need your help with this question:" The weather forecast says it................. hot tomorrow." Should we use will or going to? and why?

3 Nov 2014      



[email protected]
China

Either is correct. You could say "will be hot" or "is going to be hot." "Going to" is probably more commonly used.

4 Nov 2014     



jannabanna
France

Normally when predicting we use "will", especially in weather forecasts.

"Tomorrow will be sunny and warm in the morning, but clouds will bring rain in the afternoon."

 

4 Nov 2014     



omoussama
Tunisia

Hi.

You had better use be going to because it weather prediction.

4 Nov 2014     



douglas
United States

Both are correct, it actually depends on which form the weather person used. Otherwise you could use either.
 
A good thread on the subject:
 

4 Nov 2014     



Ruwayda37
Egypt

Thanks a lot for all your answers.

4 Nov 2014     



Zora
Canada

The rule is that predictions use "will". However, in real life, we use both forms.

4 Nov 2014     



yanogator
United States

Jannabanna s example was without "it", in which case "will" is a little more common. With "it", both are used regularly.

Bruce

4 Nov 2014     



[email protected]
Spain

Newspaper weather reports use the "will" form. It is a prediction, scientific, but prediction. Whereas, as far as I know, the "going to" form is preferred when talking about plans or intentions and events or actions that you see are coming because you have evidence that it s going to be so. But these distinctions sometimes become blurry, especially in spoken language.

4 Nov 2014     



ttuffl
Korea, South

I am the one who has to appreciate for the question and answers here. Grammar books say when they are not used interchangeably then, give very short explanations at the end like ...but somtimes.. or ...in this case you can use them both That makes me always puzzled.

4 Nov 2014     



yanogator
United States

I would say that "but sometimes" is the motto of English.

Bruce

4 Nov 2014