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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > Has/have got Vs has/have    

Has/have got Vs has/have



yingying
China

Has/have got Vs has/have
 
Hi, everybody. I just noticed  form the Sesame Street that when we describe different parts of body, people tend to say " I have got a pair of eyes" rather than  " I have a pair of eyes". Is there any difference between the two? And is it right or natural for us to say "I have". Just want to ensure I say it right and teach it right. Thanks a lot.

16 Dec 2008      



Zora
Canada

Both are correct. "have got" just emphasizes the point of "possessing" something.
 
In fact, as a teacher... I donīt like "have got"... oh, sure itīs an easy tense to learn but so is "have" as a normal verb.
 
"Have" can also be used virtually the same way as "Have got". You can say:
 
"He has a dog." or "He has got a dog" // "Has he a dog?" or "Has he got a dog?" = both are correct. The first interrogative form may sound a bit weird but it is correct.
 
Anyhow... as I was saying, I myself prefer to treat "have" as a normal verb with itīs normal conjugations. Why? Because I have found many students forget that "have got" is used only in the present simple tense. It has no other tense and therefore can become confused.
 
 

16 Dec 2008     



Vickiii
New Zealand

In regards to native speakers:
The word got is used a lot by young children as it is very easy to apply.  You will see it appear in a childs writing repeatidly. 
As children develop their vocabularly teachers actively discourage the use of the word īgotī.  You will find that it can always be replaced by a more sophisticated phrase.  It is considered a very simple way of saying something.
 
when I ask 9 year old and up children to edit their writing - I usually underline the word got and ask them to īhave a goī at changing it.
 
Example:
 
I got a bike for my birthday.
I received a bike for my birthday.
 
I got an A for my report.
I earned an A for my report.
 
I have got a pair of eyes.
I have one pair of eyes.

16 Dec 2008     



Zora
Canada

Iīd like to point out that Sesame Street is an American program and it is erroneous to think that Americans donīt use "have got". Adults may not use it as often and it is as Vickii has pointed out more of a "childīs" thing. But it is used. In Canada, we use it and I can assure you that Americanīs too...
 
 

16 Dec 2008     



yingying
China

Thanks to Zora, Tere-arg and Vickiii. Glad to be part of this community.

16 Dec 2008     



yingying
China

Just after posting the last reply, another question pops up in my mind. Which of the following sentences is correct?
 
1) My monster has a neck like a giraffee.
 
Or
 
2) My monster has a neck like a giraffeeīs.
 
And is it correct for us to put " s" after animals? or we can only put "s" after human beings  to show possession. Thanks in advance.

16 Dec 2008     



Zora
Canada

My monster has a neck like a giraffeeīs. is correct, the īs may be used with things in this case.

16 Dec 2008     



alien boy
Japan

I would think "My monster has a neck like a giraffe" is correct as it is a simile, so the neck is not in fact a giraffeīs neck, but similar.
Now if it was "My monster has a giraffeīs neck" that would be correct because it is, in fact, the neck of a giraffe.

I have actually heard this structure used both ways regularly.

Cheers,
B-)

16 Dec 2008     



Zora
Canada

Hey Alien boy,
 
To know if it is correct you would just substitute "giraffeīs"... by making a similar sentence.
 
Example: Her mother has a neck like her "sisterīs"(referring to her sisterīs neck although it has been omitted)  not "Her mother has a neck like her "sister".  (Although both are heard, I do agree with that.. )
 
It looks like a simile but itīs not really, itīs a comparison of sorts. A simile would be "She sings like a lark". // "He drives like a mad man".
 
 
Just thought Iīd add...
 
"My monster has a neck like a giraffe"... would mean "My monster has a neck in the shape/form of a giraffe" and not that it is similar to a giraffeīs... Same with the "Her mother has a neck like her "sister". .. it would mean virtually that "her neck is shaped like her sister, and not her sisterīs neck.." ALTHOUGH we natives would understand that sentence to mean that it is similar to her sisterīs but grammatically it is wrong if we are looking at the meaning she wanted to give it...
 

16 Dec 2008     



alien boy
Japan

cool!  Thanks Zora!
B-)

16 Dec 2008     



wolfy
Chile

As natives we are permitted so many errors Zora, it almost shames us for trying to correct our students. 

Hereīs some lyrics:

I have got 
I have 
I got 

Take your pick as a native speaker I reckon you could get away with any of them.

16 Dec 2008     

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