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ESL forum > Grammar and Linguistics > FROM MY POINT OF VIEW?    

FROM MY POINT OF VIEW?



maikacaceres
Spain

FROM MY POINT OF VIEW?
 
First of all, I have to say I m not a native speaker but my colleague is FROM UK and we have been taught not to use "From my point of view" to give your opinion because the real meaning of that expression is " what you can see from the place you are". Instead, we should use " In my opinion, As far as I m concerned, or In my view". Is this right? because I see the expression in many WS.

15 Jun 2011      





Yolandaprieto
Spain

I have always taugh "from my point of view" as a synonym of "in my opinion" but I am not a native speaker either, and who knows? We learn so many new things every day...
Regards
Yolanda

15 Jun 2011     



Zora
Canada

*sigh* Why do people say these kind of things? Honestly... I am beginning to think they let anyone give English class nowadays. (Sorry, not directed at you... I find this kind of ignorance amazingly galling, especially from "natives". It s like "get a dictionary" or read more...)

Yes, it is correct to say, "From my point of view..."

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/From+My+Point+Of+View


15 Jun 2011     



silvia.patti
Italy

You can show your colleague this link
http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/point-of-view

Silvia

15 Jun 2011     



almaz
United Kingdom

So, Maika, "in my view" can t be construed as "what you can see from the place you are"? Dearie me.

I m with Linda on this (*sigh*). The expression is well-established in standard English usage. If you or your friend don t like it, don t use it - but, with all due respect, try not to impose your personal peeves on others.

Oh, while we re on peeves, Alexander Fleming was not from England.

Holidays not far away now, eh? Take care,

Alex

15 Jun 2011     



maikacaceres
Spain

Sorry almaz but I didn t try to impose anything, I was just asking because I had always used "from my point of view" to introduce my opinion until some native colleagues and Escuela Oficial de Idiomas said it was wrong use. That s why I was asking. (By the way, I didn t say "in my view" ="what you can see from the place you are")

15 Jun 2011     



Zora
Canada

Hello maika,

Alex wasn t referring to "you" as you Maika, but as a general you - meaning your colleagues or other anal retentive teachers that go around telling others things just because THEY don t like it.

It wasn t a slight against you..


15 Jun 2011     



Enid Stella
South Africa

I am a native speaker and from my point of view it is absolutely acceptable to use from my point of view .
Greetings from South Africa
Enid

15 Jun 2011     



Jayho
Australia

Hi Maika
 
Often the tone of voice as well as the context can change the intended meaning of standard expressions.  Usage in a derogatory tone will certainly change the meaning compared to usage in a friendly tone.
 
Generally, From my point of view is perfectly acceptable and is often used in formal speech such as business discussions (e.g. brainstorming sessions).
 
 
Cheers
 
Jayho

15 Jun 2011     



almaz
United Kingdom

I d love to know where your native and EOI colleagues picked up the belief that the expression is wrong, despite the fact that so many usage commentators (check the links above, for example, or a corpus like COCA) are perfectly happy with it. Please ask them, although I suspect they ve simply taken the narrowest meaning of its Spanish translation punto de vista, referring to a physical viewpoint or perspective, and from this somehow made up their own silly little rule, completely ignoring any figurative uses. 

For what it s worth, my Oxford Spanish Dictionary (2nd Edition) also glosses punto de vista as (opinin) views.

15 Jun 2011     



Zora
Canada

Ya know, this reminds me of my students and how they use dictionaries. They always, and I mean always, pick the first entry without even looking at the others after it... and the crazy thing is that if they had looked further, they d have seen the correct definition with it s Spanish counterpart next to it. Confused

15 Jun 2011     

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